Government of Saskatchewan
Thursday, May 25, 2017
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C
  Canadian Foreign Policy and the Events of September 11: A Dramatic Turn
If we are to reduce, and even eliminate the violence of acts such as those of September 11, 2001, we must first understand its causes and then work to create social and political relationships that will prevent these tragedies in the future. This paper outlines the historical development of Canadian foreign policy, Canada's relationship with the United States, and foreign policy options for Canada post 9-11.
  Canadian Social Policy Renewal and the National Child Benefit
This SIPP publication reviews the context and events of the Social Policy Renewal initiative from 1995 to 1999, and documents the intergovernmental process by which the federal and provincial governments and their bureaucracies came to develop the National Child Benefit.
  Cultural and Ethnic Fundamentalism: The Mixed Potential for Identity, Liberation, and Oppression
This paper explores the process that is characteristic of fundamentalism, as well as its political purchase. The objective is not to invoke barriers to liberation, but to trace the potential for non-oppressive politics of liberation.
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H
  Health Spending in Saskatchewan: Recent Trends, Future Options
In our world of defined resources, and competing social needs, what is the best approach to financing an expensive – and increasingly costly – health care system? Mr. Daniel Hickey in his timely, thought-provoking study on health care in Saskatchewan examines this question through the two related issues of health expenditure trends and financing options.
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M
  Managing Complexity: The Lessons of Horizontal Policy-Making in the Provinces
With jurisdictions increasingly in competition with one another for investment and economic growth, governments are constantly looking for ways to be more effective in harnessing their resources to address seemingly intractable social problems. This paper identifies several valuable lessons for managing the development of public policy.
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P
  Partnerships with Aboriginal Researchers: Hidden Pitfalls and Cultural Pressures
This paper raises numerous important issues for social researchers about collaborations with Aboriginal peoples and organizations.
  Public Funding of Artistic Creation: Some Hard Questions
This paper examines in detail the variety of forms that public support for the arts could take and the procedures that would govern the kind of art that is funded.
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R
  Royal Commissions and the Policy Cycle in Canada: The Case of Health Care
When governments have concluded that a fundamental re-examination of current policy is necessary and some new approaches are necessary, they are often tempted to reach beyond both tiers of government in favour of external instruments for extraordinary policy review. This paper analyzes the case for conducting a royal commission on health care in Canada.
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T
  The Spanish Influenza and Canada's Criminal Justice System: Lessons for Pandemic Planners (Vol. I)
In his two-volume paper “The Spanish Influenza and Canada’s Criminal Justice System: Lessons for Pandemic Planners,” Mr. Fred Burch examines the question, “What can we learn by reviewing the impact of an extreme early twentieth century event on an antiquated criminal justice system in a country still in its infancy?” The answer to this question may provide valuable insight into how the impact of a virulent disease outbreak in Canada could be reduced in the 21st century.
  The Spanish Influenza and Canada's Criminal Justice System: Lessons for Pandemic Planners (Vol. II)
In his two-volume paper “The Spanish Influenza and Canada’s Criminal Justice System: Lessons for Pandemic Planners,” Mr. Fred Burch examines the question, “What can we learn by reviewing the impact of an extreme early twentieth century event on an antiquated criminal justice system in a country still in its infancy?” The answer to this question may provide valuable insight into how the impact of a virulent disease outbreak in Canada could be reduced in the 21st century.
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