Government of Saskatchewan
Wednesday, October 18, 2017
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Product List
  #IdleNoMore
Idle No More bewildered many Canadians. Launched by four women in Saskatchewan in reaction to a federal omnibus budget bill, the protest became the most powerful demonstration of Aboriginal identity in Canadian history. Thousands of Aboriginal people and their supporters took to the streets, shopping malls, and other venues, drumming, dancing and singing in a collective voice. It was a protest against generations of injustice, a rallying cry for cultural survival, and a reassertion of Aboriginal identity. Idle No More lasted for almost a year, and then the rallies dissipated. Many observers described it as a spent force. It was anything but. Idle No More was the most profound declaration of Indigenous identity and confidence in Canadian history, sparked by Aboriginal women and their supporters, sustained by young Indigenous peoples, filled with pride and determination. When the drums slowed, a new and different Canada was left in its wake. Partially stunned by the peaceful celebrations, but perplexed by a movement that seemed to have no centre and no leaders, most Canadians missed the point. Through Idle No More Aboriginal people have declared that they are a vital and necessary part of Canada’s future. The spirit of the drumming, singing and dancing lives on in empowered and confident young Aboriginal people who will shape the future of this country for decades to come.
  Beginning Cree
Designed as an introduction for Cree language learners.
  Children of the Broken Treaty: Canada's Lost Promise and One Girl's Dream
Children of the Broken Treaty exposes a system of apartheid in Canada that led to the largest youth-driven human rights movement in the country’s history. The movement was inspired by Shannen Koostachin, a young Cree woman whom George Stroumboulopoulos named as one of “five teenage girls who kicked ass in history.”
  Metis and the Medicine Line: Creating a Border and Dividing a People
Metis and the Medicine Line is a sprawling, ambitious look at how national borders and notions of race were created and manipulated to unlock access to indigenous lands. It is also an intimate story of individuals and families, brought vividly to life by history writing at its best.
  The Decolonizing Poetics of Indigenous Literatures
In The Decolonizing Poetics of Indigenous Literatures, Mareike Neuhaus uncovers residues of ancestral languages found in Indigenous uses of English. She shows how these remainders ground a reading strategy that enables us to approach Indigenous texts as literature, with its own discursive and rhetorical traditions that underpin its cultural and historical contexts.
  The Education of Augie Merasty
This memoir offers a courageous and intimate chronicle of life in a residential school.
  These Are Our Legends
Like all First Nations languages, Lillooet (Lil'wat) is a repository for an abundantly rich oral literature. In These Are Our Legends, the fifth volume of the First Nations Language Readers series, the reader will discover seven traditional Lillooet sptakwlh (variously translated into English as "legends," "myths," or "bed-time stories."
  Woods Cree Stories
Humour is not only the best medicine; it is also an exceptionally useful teaching tool. So often, it is through humour that the big lessons in life are learned--about responsibility, honour, hard work, and respect. Cree people are known for their wit, so the tales in Woods Cree Stories are filled with humour. The book includes nine stories--including Boys Get Lost, Foolishness, and Animals Become Friends--and a Woods Cree-English glossary. All the stories are presented in Cree syllabics, standard roman orthography, and English translation and can be enjoyed by those new to the language and more advanced learners.