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Monday, December 11, 2017
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Product List
  100 Days of Cree
Based on a series of Facebook posts, the 100 short chapters or "days" in the book present chains of related words, some dealing with the traditional -the buffalo hunt, the seasons-and others cheekily capturing the detritus of modern life-from internet slang to Johnny Cash songs to Viagra.
  Blackfoot Stories of Old
The third volume in the First Nations Language Readers series—meant for language learners and language users—this collection presents eight Blackfoot stories told by Lena Russell Ikkináínihki ‘Gentle Singer,’ a fluent speaker of Blackfoot from the Kainai (Blood) reserve in southern Alberta. In contrast with other Algonquian languages, such as Cree and Saulteaux (Ojibwe), Blackfoot is not usually written in syllabics, so these stories are presented in the Blackfoot language using the Roman alphabet, together with the English translation. The spelling system is based on the conventions of the International Phonetic Alphabet, and should be transparent for native speakers of Blackfoot as well as for linguists. The Reader includes a Blackfoot-to-English glossary containing all the nouns, verbs, adjuncts, etc., found in the texts, as well as stress or pitch accents over the vowel or vowels which bear the accent.
  Funny Little Stories
This is the first in a series of readers in the First Nations languages of the prairie provinces meant for language learners and language users. This stories in this volume come from a variety of sources, all being narrated or written by fluent speakers of Cree, whether students or instructors of the Cree language or Elders, and representing a wide array of dialect differences including examples of Plains, Woods and Swampy Cree.
  Nenapohs Legends
Intended for use as a language textbook, this volume contains seven traditional stories of the Saulteaux trickster, Nênopohš.
  That's Raven Talk
A reading strategy for orality in North American Indigenous literatures that is grounded in Indigenous linguistic traditions.
  The Decolonizing Poetics of Indigenous Literatures
In The Decolonizing Poetics of Indigenous Literatures, Mareike Neuhaus uncovers residues of ancestral languages found in Indigenous uses of English. She shows how these remainders ground a reading strategy that enables us to approach Indigenous texts as literature, with its own discursive and rhetorical traditions that underpin its cultural and historical contexts.
  The Knowledge Seeker: Embracing Indigenous Spirituality
In The Knowledge Seeker, Blair Stonechild shares his sixty-year journey of learning-from residential school to PhD and beyond-while trying to find a place for Indigenous spirituality in the classroom.
  These Are Our Legends
Like all First Nations languages, Lillooet (Lil'wat) is a repository for an abundantly rich oral literature. In These Are Our Legends, the fifth volume of the First Nations Language Readers series, the reader will discover seven traditional Lillooet sptakwlh (variously translated into English as "legends," "myths," or "bed-time stories."
  Woods Cree Stories
Humour is not only the best medicine; it is also an exceptionally useful teaching tool. So often, it is through humour that the big lessons in life are learned--about responsibility, honour, hard work, and respect. Cree people are known for their wit, so the tales in Woods Cree Stories are filled with humour. The book includes nine stories--including Boys Get Lost, Foolishness, and Animals Become Friends--and a Woods Cree-English glossary. All the stories are presented in Cree syllabics, standard roman orthography, and English translation and can be enjoyed by those new to the language and more advanced learners.